Why we’re fatter than in the 1950s - Warren Nash - Buy Bentyl

Why we’re fatter than in the 1950s - Warren Nash

Why we’re fatter than in the 1950s – Warren Nash

By Bryan Wright 28 Comments July 14, 2019



you'd be hard-pressed to have not noticed the high rates and obesity in the developed world today despite more of us than ever being obsessed with diet and clean eating however aside from what we're eating we're told more sedentary lifestyles are a big contributor to the obesity epidemic only fifty years ago people were significantly thinner and that's despite being far less conscious about diet and what they were eating in the 1950s an average woman's waist size was 27 inches compared with 34 inches today so why back in a time when people weren't fussed about what they ate and sweet puddings high in saturated fat were commonplace after an evening meal did the population then managed to lead much healthier lifestyles an obvious assumption is our more sedentary jobs are a contributing factor to the rise in obesity I'll touch on that later but let's start with lifestyles at home first cars post-war and when the country was still getting back on its feet cars were considered a luxury and ownership was significantly lower just 15% of homes owned a car compared with 80 percent today so alternative means of transport had to be used as jumping in the car simply wasn't an option for most people let's think about grocery shopping in the 1950s most people had to walk or get public transport to their local shops the growth of the supermarket was on the rise but this concept was still very much in its early days so shopping would involve walking between a number of stores like the butchers the green grocers the Baker's or the hardware store compared to today where we can shop for everything under one roof and then with the shopping done getting home meant either walking or getting public transport carrying heavy bags as the number of bags one person can carry is far less than you can load into a car boot that also meant more frequent shopping trips during the week as well plus only 15% of households owned a refrigerator back then another reason for more frequent grocery shops to keep your produce fresh all in all that's a lot more walking and activity just a stocky kitchen cupboard let's compare this with today we hop in a car and drive to one store where we buy everything we need then transport a week's worth of shopping home that requires a lot less effort and calorie expenditure than the same task back in the 1950s and with the internet we've made it easier still we can order everything online without even moving from a chair lower calorie expenditure still with cars less available back in the day this meant heavier reliance on public or alternative means of transport to get anywhere whether you're catching a bus or a train it required expending energy to get to your stop alternatively simply walking or cycling was a popular and cheap form of transport all burning more calories than jumping in the car or getting an uber in the home technology has crept in to make chores less labor-intensive today we take for granted being able to throw our dirty laundry into a washing machine and it come out clean but it wasn't always this easy in the 1950s only 1/3 of families owned a washing machine which meant the majority had to clean their clothes by hand often with the use of a washboard this was a very manual process taking much longer per item than an automatic washing machine and with no spin cycle hand cranked ringers were commonplace removing water from garments again a fairly labor-intensive activity so the calorie expenditure of just washing your clothes 2 to 3 times per week was much higher than simply loading a washing machine then there's general cleaning let's think about the effort required getting in your hands and knees to scrub the floors or clean your carpets with brushes you get the picture between 1950 and 1955 television in the UK had only one channel in 1955 two more channels were introduced all of which broadcast at specific times during the day needless to say there wasn't much on no remote controls not the you need one and with the lack of other technology back then people were much more self-sufficient – entertaining themselves and this generally meant unless you're reading a book just getting up and well doing something whether it was kicking a ball around in street tending veg in the garden or a trip to the allotment more calories would generally expended whilst entertaining oneself back then let's take a moment to compare this to how we entertain ourselves today it's shocking how much external stimulation we absorb whilst being completely sedentary but it's not just in leisure time that people were more active in the 1950s work was a lot more labor intense as well let's take the example of a car production line so many more tasks on the 1950s production line were fulfilled by the human hand when you consider the number of components in a car it took a lot more stages to assemble one it took a lot of hours of manual labor to get cars rolling off the line today robots have replaced many of the jobs traditionally performed by hand with greater accuracy speed and precision labor of this type is pretty much dwindled and been replaced by the robotic arm even traditional jobs such as carpenters Baker's or even switchboard workers have been replaced with machines or computer's making tasks even less labor-intensive so where does this leave us we've obviously been in a period of decline when it comes to physical activity being a natural part of our lifestyle the introduction of technology to make our lives easier more comfortable and pleasurable has been at the price of less physical jobs and activities the problem most of us have encountered today's lack of calorie expenditure compared to the 1950s by adjusting our energy intake plus the way we eat more snacking and the type of food we consume high in fat and sugar has contributed to an obesity crisis as time has gone on perhaps the notion of performing manual tasks seems old-fashioned for us today the objective is all about making life as energy efficient as possible in a nutshell on one side of the energy balance we're packing more calories into the food we eat creating energy dense convenience products and on the other side we've removed the need to expend energy from our lifestyles so it's no wonder we're getting bigger one thing's for sure is about balance simply put its a basic notion of calories in versus calories out back in the 1950s people may have eaten more but they were simply burning off more calories today many of us try to diet and consume less calories but are expending so much less energy as part of our daily lifestyle that we have to allocate special time to be active we expect a one-hour gym session three times a week to work miracles but when you think that three hours of activity is just 2% of our week that's asking a lot and here's the irony we've used technology to remove so much calorie expenditure from our lifestyles and now we're using it to put activity back in the huge growth and sales of activity trackers to count how many steps we take or apps on our phone to map my run or help us workout suggests digital health tracking is the future and if we can no longer achieve sufficient energy burn through manual labor and chores balancing our calorie intake also needs to be done through mindful eating whether we like it or not few of us are now able to manage this calorie balance by guesswork it has to be consciously incorporated into our 21st century lifestyles a really useful app that can help is nutracheck it's a calorie counter and exercise tracker app designed to help you strike a healthy balance between calories in and calories out it has a huge database of UK and u.s. foods and the app scanned barcodes so it's really easy to just scan an item and log your calories the nutracheck exercise database has the calorie burn figures for over a thousand activities from household chores home fitness DVDs and gym workouts it also links with Fitbit activity trackers so you can sync your daily step count with your exercise diary having all your calorie intake and activity expenditure in one place that you can check anytime is a great way to manage your weight that only takes a few minutes a day download the nutracheck app and sign up your seven day free trial today and if you like what you try save 20% with the exclusive code 1950 when you subscribe a nutracheck time code on UK

28 Comments found

User

A T

Well thats easy. All the chemicals in everything we put on our bodies and in our bodies 🤦🏻‍♀️

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User

peggy peggy

Just eat real food. If it does not grow in the ground, then don't eat it. If it's not nutritional then don;t eat it. Eat when you're hungry–period. We make it so complicated. It's SIMPLE!!!

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User

Leona Andreea

Off topic, but let's bring skirts and dresses back, ladies

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User

avner 888

I’m eating a powdered donut while I watch this.

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User

cattus lavandula

But, in the 1970s cars and tvs were everywhere, we ate horrible processed foods, including fast foods, and people were still thinner than today. Even those who smoked dope and got the munchies weren't very fat. I wonder how modern medications play into our weight gain?

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User

A. J. Patten

I wonder if smoking cigarettes also kept people from eating so much?

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User

rkl349

I grew up in the 50s and must say you do not know of what you speak. We were poor (single uneducated mom) but had a car and a washer and shopped by car for groceries once a week Want the true cause of fat people, look at the change in food that started in the 80s – if you eat organic you will be fine. I am 66 6'1" 195 and I eat what I want including sugar (cain sugar)and fat (which is NOT bad for you) and salt to taste. My blood pressure is 112 over 70 NO I'm NOT just lucky if you stay away from processed garbage, GMO, HFCS you will be fine. I made it through high school on long johns (that's a donut) and pepsi, I am not diabetic nor am I on ANY prescriptions. I noticed you pushed a health app you shill. Do some real research not just spit out the crap from big corporations!

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User

Elisa Mondragon

This is just an ad for an app 👎

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User

climate engineering is killing the eco system

two words  CORN SYRUP

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User

big un

Im hungry. I want some sugar. Just spoonfuls of sugar

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User

big un

I wish I had some gravy and fatback bacon and eggs and biscits and pancakes and waffles and steak and fried chickens

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User

big un

Im big as an elephant 🐘
They know me at mickiedees by my first name. I love gravy on everthang

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User

big un

I be a big ole jabba da hut so wut. I be a squrrel eatin lots of nuts. Im a big ole fat bababoom. I also eat in the bathroom

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User

Shmoo Stead

Americans leading the way as always.

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User

Sam Labo

Feminism.
The flab glaciers of today also think we should date them,
I'm not risking getting eaten
Japan should hunt land whales in the west

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User

Ron Benoche

Get off the rider mower and get out the push mower..

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User

of course

who else is watching this eating 3 hamburgers?

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User

Bully Dawg

Can't help to wonder how all of the communications marketing and being inundated 24/7 with propagated food related commercials have influenced the urge to pig out?

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User

Aggro Traveler’s Bucket List

So basically: the things that make our lives easier are also killing us

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User

JLT Yes

Very informative

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User

MrStevekehl

Half the population smoked in the 50s. Great for the waistline.

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User

monikag1323

High fructose corn syrup in EVERYTHING for the last 10 years.

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User

THE MUSIC ENHANCEMENT CHANNEL

There are also more factors to be considered since I've done research on this subject.
The lack of ENZYMES because of canned, bottled and frozen foods. One group of pigs were given raw potatoes and the other group given cooked potatoes. The group given raw potatoes were slim and athletic looking but the group fed cooked potatoes were very OBESE! See a connection here with humans. Go do some research on enzymes and you will be amazed what you discover about them and their relation to health.

Without enzymes, life itself would not be possible.
A dearth of enzymes leads to chronic, degenerative
disease and premature aging.
Enzymes work as the 'labor force' of your body system.
All metabolic processes require mediation by specific
enzymes.
Enzymes, extremely heat labile, are your passports to
prolonged youth and increased vitality.
The rejuvenating and therapeutic effects of raw food
enzymes can be beneficial to your health!
An enzyme rich diet of predominantly raw foods can
contribute to safe, effective and rapid weight control.
Cooked food, even though fortified with vitamins, can
lead to disease.
The legendary longevity and outstanding health of
certain primitive societies can be attributed to their
consumption of high-enzyme raw food.

Dr. Edward Howell, a pioneer
researcher in food enzymes and
human nutrition, was born in Chicago.
After obtaining a limited medical
license from the state of Illinois, he
spent six years on the professional
staff of the Lindlahr Sanitarium, a well
known 'nature cure' hospital
predominantly utilizing nutrition and
physical therapies. In 1930, he
established his own facility for the
treatment and research of chronic
ailments through nutrition and physical
modalities. He is also the author of
another treatise, Enzyme Nutrition,
published in 1985.

Enzymes are complex proteins that perform as biological change agents.
These various types of enzymes for health, similar to "spark plugs" in your
body, allow your body to exist. Every chemical reaction in the human body is
"ignited" or occurs because of beneficial enzymes. Minerals, vitamins, and
hormones can only work because of the power of enzymes. The human
species is enzyme-dependent. Without essential enzymes, our lives would
cease. Whereas vitamins and minerals are lifeless chemical substances, the different
types of enzymes contain a vital force. Each enzyme contains a biological life
force at its center. Enzymes bring this invigorating life energy to our bodies.
When it comes time to maintaining our health and healing our bodies,
enzymes are the "worker bees" that get the job done. They do the actual
work to allow your many bodily functions and activities to carry on, day in and
day out.

In 1930, nutritional researchers were aware of 80 various types of enzymes,
by 1968, researchers were aware of 1300 enzymes and today over 5,000
types of enzymes have been identified. Though much is understood about the
vital role enzymes play in the human body, the more enzyme research that
occurs, the more our enzymes health benefits awareness grows.

Dr. Edward Howell was born in Chicago in 1898. He is the holder of a limited medical license from the state of Illinois. The holder of a limited practice is required to pass the same medical boards as a medical doctor. Only surgery, obstetrics and
materia medica are excluded. After obtaining his license, Dr. Howell joined the professional staff of the Lindlahr Sanitarium, where he remained for six years. In 1930, he established a private facility for the treatment of chronic ailments by nutritional and physical methods.
Until he retired in 1970, Dr. Howell was busy in private practice three days each week. The balance of this time he devoted to various kinds of research.

Dr. Howell is the first researcher to recognize the importance of the enzymes in food to human nutrition. In 1946, he wrote the book, "The Status of Food Enzymes in Digestion and Metabolism". Dr. Howell's latest book is entitled "Enzyme Diet". This book contains the reference and source materials for the enzyme theories which Dr. Howell has collectively called The Food Enzyme Concept. The manuscript for "Enzyme Diet" reviews the scientific literature through 1973. It is approximately 160,000 words long and contains 47 tables and 695 references to the world's scientific literature. In this interview, Dr. Howell tells what enzymes are, what they do in our bodies, why he believes a state of enzyme deficiency
stress exists in most people, and finally, what he believes you can do about it.
"Neither vitamins, minerals nor hormones can do any work — without enzymes."

Dr. Howell mentions that our canine pets, now being fed these same enzyme
deficient diets, are experiencing the same diseases as man. Whereas animals
in the wild with their enzyme rich diets, are largely disease free. In fact, Dr.
Howell also states that in the animal kingdom the animals bury or cover their
foods to allow the raw food enzymes to begin predigesting their food, before
they come back to eat it. Later consuming this predigested food, allows the
animals to further preserve their own valuable enzyme supply.

The introduction of HIGH FRUCTOSE CORN SYRUP is another culprit. See next comment:

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User

Always Tired

Wow. Mention the 1950s and all the sexists, homophobes, and racists come to the comment section. How lovely 😂

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User

Alina Krohn

Brilliant!

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User

G M

Welfare food will make you fat.

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User

Chad Castagana

In the 1950's only 15% of American households owned a private automobile of thier own? How many others rented cars? What about work vehicles?
Only 15% of US households in the 1950's had a refrigerator? I don't think that us true, it had to be higher. Do you count ice-boxes? Also, fresh milk, like ice blocks, were delivered to your door!

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User

Manish Sharma

Smooth and good way to advertise calorie counter app.

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