Vitamins and Supplements: Less is More - Buy Bentyl

Vitamins and Supplements: Less is More

Vitamins and Supplements: Less is More

By Bryan Wright 16 Comments July 12, 2019

16 Comments found

User

cora J. Bouzane

This is a very honest person Kudos!

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Janet Tepolt

OK, so, I like most of his presentation, however, I don't agree with his assessment that there is minimal benefit of eating organic foods. There certainly has been an increase of cancers in the population since all these chemicals have been introduced. The incidence of cancer years ago when people grew their own food was clearly significantly lower. Just an observation.

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RawLu

That's all I ever hear is eat a healthy diet etc.??? what about those who NEVER HAVE & NEVER WILL!?! like me!. like probably most people who look towards supplements to maybe help??? Do they help those people who are most likely Deficient???…

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Lauraqueen F

Too many miss informations, some say they swear by A,E and C vitamin, but this guy said don't take it. , I will say do what is best for you. High does Vitamin c cured my 9 year long insomnia and cure my life long digestive problem. I wondered why my Dr didn't
know about this simple care instead he put me on sleeping pills and depression meds. It wasn't useful what so ever in fact my sleep problems became worst and my mood was terrible. I.dont agree with the recommendations from this guy, this is a typical big phama doctor!

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roberto R

Um a um a um um aaaah… ffs, learn public speaking, join toastmasters

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Nancy Gurish

Certainly real food is best; make sure
you don't settle for GMO – and make
sure your supplements are real ones!
Don't settle!
~~~Nancy
Vitamin C Has Copper IN it! Real C!
https://youtu.be/aUNsNHlONq4

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David Sander

One of the problems here is the demand for randomized tests apparently run by non-experts in nutritional research..
The Dr Coimbra protocol for reversing MS with high levels of Vitamin D carefully administered by a physician results in a 95% rate of improvement. NO randomized test is need to say that this works. How do they explain that after I started taking 5000 IU of vitamin D3, that my tripping and falling in training runs stopped? I'm not elderly and I run in the sunshine, but that was not enough. I'm healthy enough to run a marathons at the time.

My diet has included plenty of carrots, but this was not enough to give me adequate vitamin A. My benefits were I found a reduction of 2/3 im my getting viruses and sick after starting on large doses of retinol vitamin A in addition to vitamin D. My sore back from running and dancing started to get better with added Retinol vitamin A, my skin looks younger and my eyes focus close better due to improved focusing muscle strength. Previously I was limited to running under two miles due to my back soreness, now it is no problem to run five miles.

Be warned that they don't know that the DRA for Vitamin E specifies Alpha Tocopherol. The improvement for cardiac events happens primarily due to use of the gamma tocopherol in natural vitamin E supplements, so its no wonder that alpha tocopherol based research fails so badly. giving lots of alpha tocopherol dilutes the presence of natural gamma tocopheral in the diet and produces null or negative results in reducing cardiac events.

My review of this unscientific, ridiculous, and one sided presentation stops here!

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User

Timothy Jackson

Good talk, as supplements should be considered by strength and quality of evidence just as with prescription medication and diets. However, part of this talk demonstrates how pervasive the misunderstandings of p-values continue to be. Even this physician researcher misinterprets p-values. Beginning at 19:10, he states this p-value indicates "the probability of this happening due to chance…" P-values do not and cannot confer this. They are probability of the data given the null hypothesis being true. In other words, they rely on the null hypothesis.

Also, the "probability of this data given my hypothesis" (p-value) is much different than the "probability of my hypothesis given this data."

Also, p-values tell you nothing about effect size.

Basically, it's discouraging that the overuse, misuse and misunderstandings of p-values exist even at a place of scientific excellence like UCSF.

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User

Common Sense A Super Power

Good to know most nutrients come from food (where we should get it from) rather than the shortcut mentality that most people have. At worse, most people believe that if a little is good, a lot must be better.

I use to think that way before I met my husband. He was a lecturer and veterinary surgeon. He doesn't put his animals on supplements unless they are deficient. They get their nutrition entirely from food. He himself is one of the fittest men I've ever met. He suggested I try stopping all the supplements I was taking and get my nutrition completely from food. I was against that idea but thought it should be okay to try for 2 to 3 months.

The transformation was amazing. My skin became clear and supple (none of the natural supplements I took even came close to what a healthy diet has done for my skin). Inflammation went down. Blood test results came back even better than the results I had in 2011 when I was on lots of vitamins and minerals (yes even food based multivitamins). I use to take fiber supplements too, but don't need that anymore because I get so much fiber from food. It was challenging at first because cooking fresh food takes a lot of time, but now it has become a lifestyle habit – I MAKE time. Think of it as an investment in yourself. The sad part is, before relying entirely on food, I was already eating relatively healthy but still had heavy reliance on supplements and not gaining any positive effects from them.

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User

Edgar Kaufmann

How should I believe this complicated stuff as long as health is a business and the politicians and medical top influencers are the result of long-term recruitment by Big Pharma and medical technology companies?

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oares00

This video is of no use at all! I see milk and fish (!!!) as source of vitamin D (sic!). Have a look at all old people with broken hips after drinking milk a life long? Milk and all animal nutrients are acidifying, catastrofic molecules for bones

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Fred Pauser

I'm sure this doctor means well, but there is so much wrong with this presentation…

For example, the section about calcium and vitamin D is mostly worthless. I'll address only that section, as follows:

For healthy bones and healthy arteries and heart you cannot study just calcium alone, or D alone, or even just Ca and D together. The body uses MANY NUTRIENTS SYNERGISTICALLY!! The doctor mentioned there are indications that high calcium can lead to heart attack or stroke — that is correct. Ditto if one gets extremely high doses of vit D alone.

D is needed to absorb calcium into the blood — BUT THEN VITAMIN K2 IS NEEDED TO GET THE CALCIUM INTO THE BONE WHERE IT BELONGS. If not enough K2, some of the calcium gets laid down in the arteries leading to atherosclerosis.

Another factor in this: If there is insufficient Vit A, any excess calcium again tends to get laid down in the arteries (and other soft tissues). Vit A escorts excess calcium out of the body.

Also vitamin C plays a role in proper bone maintenance — for strong bones you need to make collagen (for connective tissue) and you cannot make collagen without vitamin C.

So for healthy bones, arteries, and heart you need vitamins D3, K2, E, A, and C, (and more) all as a symphony.

Why do medical people do trials focusing on one or two nutrients only at a time? Could it be due to conflict of interests? Could it be that if people are cured via nutrition they will need less drugs and medical interventions?

Study what NUTRITIONISTS say about nutrition, not what the medical profession says about that subject. (Unfortunately even among nutritionists you'll find controversy… critical thinking required in all cases.)

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DjDedan

to sum up antioxidant section: more is not necessarily better.
to sum up vitamin d section: stop wearing sunblock and go walk (don't drive) naked in the winter time.

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ILykToDoDuhDrifting

Videos need a freaking TLDR and table of contents. AIn't nobody got time for dis.

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Coastwalker

Interesting talk which recommends starting off by eating a Mediterranean or similar balanced diet to be healthy.

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David Hume

Intro: how to dismiss or accept new mainstream media reporting of vitamin research without reading said research! Doesn't look promising. The medical community has been so spectacularly wrong about nutrition, health and obesity in the past we should be highly sceptical.

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