The Doctor V64 - Nintendo 64 DevKit or Piracy Device ? | MVG - Buy Bentyl

The Doctor V64 – Nintendo 64 DevKit or Piracy Device ? | MVG

The Doctor V64 – Nintendo 64 DevKit or Piracy Device ? | MVG

By Bryan Wright 100 Comments December 11, 2019


[MUSIC] On November 21st 1997 Nintendo of America filed a lawsuit in federal court against Hong kong-based bung enterprises limited according to the lawsuit Nintendo argued that bung had willfully and directly Infringed Nintendo’s copyrights and trademarks with the sale of a device known as the doctor V64 a backup device used to play Nintendo 64 games illegally and they were seeking damages and an immediate injunction To stop the manufacture and distribution of the product Nintendo also argued that the sale of any device that circumvented the Nintendo 64 security measures was Illegal the courts agreed and granted Nintendo’s motion and bung was ordered to cease all sales of the Dr. V64 Nintendo was awarded 7 million dollars in damages yet the Dr. V64 has made its way into some well-known development houses such as acclaim one of the largest third-party developers on the Nintendo 64 at the time who used the product as an unofficial dev kit on Turok 3 and others So how did this come to be in 1994 bung Enterprises was formed by Thomas Magnus and was focused on building electronic devices That would allow game systems on cartridge to be backed up of course another way to say this is that these were Piracy tools once you had a ROM then you didn’t need the original to play bung developed many backup devices including the game doctor for the Super Famicom and the GB exchanger which used flash chips to back up Game Boy games bung was mostly unknown to North America But when the popular online store lik-sang dot com began to sell bung products Nintendo became aware of the company By the time the Nintendo 64 was released Nintendo was well aware of disk copies that we used to flood the market Especially on the Super NES and they took further steps to boost security the Nintendo 64 used a CIC lockout chip just like the Super NES and NES before it but this time the algorithm was much more advanced and the CIC chip worked in conjunction with the peripheral interface or piff as it’s known and this was much more complex to Circumvent it also became quickly apparent that floppy disk copiers would become obsolete in general Nintendo 64 roms are much larger than the Super Nintendo counterparts and even the smallest n64 ROM would spend multiple discs But the same goes for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction both developers and the public wanted the Nintendo 64 to use CD ROMs when it was clear that Nintendo was going to stay with cartridges. It wasn’t received. Well popular RPG developer on the Super Nintendo Squaresoft cancelled all development on the Nintendo 64 and moved their efforts to the Sony Playstation 1 and took advantage of the CD ROM format where they would develop one of the best video games ever made Final Fantasy 7 the PlayStation had CD ROM video CD and audio CD the Nintendo 64 had none of these So electronics manufacturers in Taiwan and Hong Kong including bung who were well established by now began building CD ROM based backup devices that utilize the expansion port found underneath the Nintendo 64 This port was only ever used for one thing the 64DD but it was reverse engineered and discovered that the bottom expansion port has the same connectors as the cartridge port This meant that a third party add-on could be developed with a custom BIOS and use a CD ROM drive to boot games from and keep the cartridge port free for other things It also meant with an original cartridge It could be used to circumvent the lockout security check as the Nintendo 64 would think that an official game was connected this would become the CD ROM drive that the Nintendo 64 never officially received So I finally got my hands on a dr. V64 This was a piece of hardware that I wanted to get for my collection for a while So let’s go ahead and take a look and see what this device actually does and how it operates bung enterprises released the Dr. V64 originally in 1997 at the cost of four hundred and fifty US dollars on face value that is quite expensive But it has many features that justify the cost The Dr. V64 plugs into the Nintendo 64’s connecter and comes with an IDE cd-drive Initial units came with an 8x CD Drive but later models incorporated 16 and 32 speed CD drives The heart of the Dr. V64 is the MOS technology 6502 CPU and a custom bios The 6502 is a popular 8-bit CPU that was used in many computers and consoles such as the Atari 800 Commodore vic-20 and nintendo entertainment system the V64 contains its own memory Initially came with 128 mega bits or 16 Mega Bytes of RAM But this was increased to 256 mega bits or 32 Mega Bytes as the size of the games on cartridge began to increase Although the Dr. V64 is a Nintendo 64 backup device it can also be used as a video CD player and this was one of the ways bung enterprises managed to get this product through customs and in North America even after their court case with Nintendo they simply Rebranded and in some cases just concealed the fact that this product was a backup device for the Nintendo 64 But the system came with a cd-rom full of Nintendo 64 roms Which was certainly one of the areas of concern for Nintendo You would simply turn on the Dr. V64 navigate to the ROM that you wanted to load and it would load itself into the Dr V64’s main memory, but in order to play backup software the Dr. V64 came with an adapter that you would connect into the cartridge port and you would plug in any cartridge from any region this was used as a donor cartridge and utilized the CIC lockout chip in order to bypass the security check Once the game had completely loaded from CD into the dr V 64 s main memory turning on the Nintendo 64 would treat the dr V 64 like it was just another cartridge that was plugged in the Dr. V64 would also allow you to dump the content of a cartridge to a ROM incidentally if you’ve ever downloaded a Nintendo 64 ROM and seen the extension .V64 It’s originally come from the Dr. V64 as that was the file extension the device used for its ROM dumps dumping a cartridge is stored in the Dr. V 64 s main memory and of course this is volatile and as soon as you turn off the system the contents are lost But there was another way to dump games and retain them and that’s to use a PC one of the features of the dr v64 is its ability to transfer files allowing you to send any contents of the DRAM to a PC so you could make ROM dumps of any cartridge you could also use this feature to dump the BIOS as well as this you Could upload a new updated BIOS to the Dr. V64 So let’s be clear the bung enterprises Dr. V64 is a l It allows you to dump ROMs from cartridge burn them onto a CD You can have a CD full of Nintendo 64 roms and then load those roms back onto the Nintendo 64 without needing the original game I mean that is a piracy tool in anyone’s book but where it gets interesting is on the back of the bung Dr. V64 is a parallel port connector and interfacing into a PC would allow the bung Dr. V64 to turn itself into a fully-fledged Nintendo 64 development with a Windows PC, Parallel cable and a Nintendo 64 MIPS cross compiler by plugging one end into the PC and the other end into the Dr V64 meant that you could write code on your pc then push it to the nintendo 64 and test this meant that the Dr V64 could be used as a development kit by simply leaving the transfer program enabled on the dr 64 you could transmit new data over to test and debug quickly Although you couldn’t do some advanced stuff like remote debugging use of debug symbols and breakpoints It worked well enough and for 450 US dollars all of a sudden became a very attractive proposition for development studios working on nintendo 64 games and the dr v64 was more than capable as a development kit, even bung would frequent nintendo 64 Usenet groups to advertise the Dr V64 as a development kit and attempt to undercut Nintendo Why pay Nintendo three to four thousand dollars more for their development kit that does about the same thing Equipped 10 or more programmers play testers for the price of one Nintendo SDK Imagine saving 30 to 40 thousand dollars in development costs in one shot. They proclaimed Acclaim Studios in Austin the same development studio who worked on the turok line of games used dr V64’s in their office during the development and testing of Turok 3 But the timeline here is important Turok 3 was released in August of 2000 for the Nintendo 64 in North America Nintendo won its court case against bung in 1999 so how does acclaim studios end up using illegal backup devices as dev kits? Quite simply cost a Nintendo 64 partner development kit was very expensive to purchase Even though a claim had millions of dollars in the bank It made more sense to them just to buy a four hundred and fifty dollar Alternative and provide them to all developers and testers in the studio It’s not entirely clear if they used the dr V64 on any other projects but they certainly had them and they used them on the Turok 3 project Bung enterprises themselves also wanted to promote the Dr V64 for homebrew development a demo competition known as presence of mine or POM was set up in 1998 with bung as the major sponsor and supplied. Dr V 64 s as prizes the contest also occurred in 1999 and there were some very clever and innovative demos that came out of this particular demo competition After Nintendo won its court case bung ceased selling their products But not before they tried to rebrand and try a few shady tricks to keep selling their products in North America Four days after bung announced they were closing down operations They returned as first union limited initially bung denied that they were connected First Union supposedly had products that were compatible with bung but in reality was the same company trying to fill Outstanding bung orders. It’s also worth noting that the dr V64 was released in 1997 before the first ever Nintendo 64 emulators were released on the PC Back then no one was emulating the n64 So unless you own original nintendo 64 hardware and a way to load ROMs There was not much you could do with the ROMs themselves of course these days all this is replaced by one of these an everdrive cartridge and while it’s easy to forget about the Dr V64 it’s unique set of features meant that it was so much more than just another tool for piracy So there you have it guys, that’s the story of the bung enterprises Dr V64 interesting story to go back and revisit Obviously this hardware was used for piracy first and foremost I mean you could load Nintendo 64 roms off a CD that came supplied with the hardware itself So I mean this was a piracy tool first and foremost no question about it yet. Somehow ended up being a development kit for major development studios in North America, like acclaim for the development of games like Turok 3 So how does that happen? And I think at the end of the day that Acclaim and other studios saw the cost benefit of a four hundred and fifty dollar Development kit versus the tens of thousands of dollars that you would have to spend on official Nintendo 64 development hardware back at the time and really just You know leverage the cost savings that they were able to get from these types of things and utilize the bung Dr. V64 for the development of turok 3 I mean you know ten of these would cost you four and a half thousand and you could purchase one for every developer in your dev studio and Essentially it would do the same thing as the kind of high-end nintendo 64 development hardware that was around at the same time So it was a no-brainer at the time to utilize hardware like this in order to do your development on well guys I’m going to leave it here for this video. I hope you enjoyed it Let me know what you thought about it in the comments below if you liked this video, you know what to do Leave me a thumbs up as always don’t forget to Like and subscribe and I’ll catch you guys in the next video Bye for now [MUSIC]

100 Comments found

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Andrew Dixon

So Bung changed their name to 'First Union'… F U.

Was that a message to Nintendo?

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L C

whats wrong with a little piracy

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YeonJiKun

7:34 I just noticed that on the right of parallel connector, there's input audio/video port.
And in 7:54 N64 is turned off while V64 is still turned on. So maybe V64 does pass-through the N64 A/V to TV when playing games?

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SCU Later

I see you're interested in tires or tyres. Well done Google hahaha.

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User

Comtreras fer Sanches chavarria

Cuanto cuesta el envío de un cartucho

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Darren Butcher

i have a dr 64 in the loft, i loved it

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Matt Bland

Cool Speedball T-Shirt Where can I get one of those? Much nicer than others I've seen online.

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1George2

Very interesting indeed!!

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Phonotical

VI is six…

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Bernie Williams

Loving the Commodore Monitor. Miss my Amiga

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Andrew Crawford

3:00 You said Final Fantasy 7, but the video shows Final Fantasy 6

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Brandon Colebankz

It's literally not piracy if you owned the game. If you took your own game and made a rom from it. It's your rom.

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petey 815

1:43
lol bung products

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dragon tragedy

Nobody these days with a man bun holding a white claw cares about piracy on a ancient video game system

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Tony T

sooooo sllllowwwwwwwwwwwwwwww

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stealthballer

vii not vi for ffvii

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Verwarde man

anyone know the name of the first music track used? thanks

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Drum Eagle

Please do a video on the Mr. Backup Z64

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MySqueezingArm

At 3:00 you say Final Fantasy VII, but typed VI. I assume video is from VII. Not trying to be rude just helpful!

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Master Matthew

2:57

That says 6 not 7.

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User

#OUTLANDISH

its proper scummy

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GEEW1ZZ

Frame yourself a bit higher in your shots. You are dead in the middle of screen

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nic tse

turok 3 use it to develop, but turok 12 use what?

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ricki vaughan

I had one of these badboys with 256mb back in the day, i was mortified when it broke and i couldn't get the parts to fix it

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Sampler19

Neat, a Speedball 1 conaisseur! I used to like those changing arenas.

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Ben Quigley

Would really like to see a vid on the Expansion Pak and how useless it seemed to be

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N Jones

i got one of these a few months ago…a bit embarrassed I only payed £100 for it 🙂
256mb and white-buttons rather than dark-grey.

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Brad Ausrotas

Had a V64 Jr. as a kid with my N64. Approximately ~350 ROMs to choose from back then. Mario Party II in Japanese, transferred through ICQ, hot off the usenet. Fond memories.

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User

Gaming with H3RBSKI

loved mine as a kid should never have sold it 🙁

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MadFinnTech

3:08 I hope that kick by Jesse will be epic in the upcoming REMAKE!

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Stance santos

Great video, can you make video about the super magic drive next?

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Jenna Fearon

We used some of these at Boss Game Studio (World Driver Championship, etc.), and I still have mine they gave me when they closed down (I was an artist there). Always thought this thing was pretty cool, thanks for the history video. 🙂

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Austin Downing

If nintendo sued over it you know its good.

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Bara Al-Arfaj

am I the only one interested in that intro music? 🙁

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A Person

I love these video game history lessons

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Jamie Henderson

Mine was definitely for piracy.

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Boaphlipsy

Drinking Game
Everytime he says Dr. V64 you take a shot

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wunk wonk

I miss these old copiers. Today's flash carts are awesome but there was something about messing around with floppies/zip disks

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Nill

I have the same vaporwave wallpaper.

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Outside998

"One of the best games ever made, Final Fantasy 7."
One of the most overrated games, more like it, in my opinion.

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Nunya Nunya

z64 owner here! best everrrrrr. got it when it was new, booom had all games. also tp in bunghole yes

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Kurasa

Oh man! A friend of mine had one of these when we were in high school (98/99/00) and no one believed us!

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John Ross

What's up with the retarded love for slow ass CD's?

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march12314

Piracy forever. <3

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Virgil van Soest

all games for n64 on 5 cds

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RyuX

Omg.. Liksang.. I forgot about this site..

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S B

FU Bung!

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Benjamin Hausmann

Would a bluerey disk Reader Upgrade work on that xd

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Eric Ostro

This guy looks like joe rogan if he gave up

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User

hello 123

Bastard duck duck go

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cazmaj

Jesus, I had this for years and I didn't know I could copy games with it haha

Mine had the power supply die (happened a lot) .. May have to see if I can't replace it.

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Grits

man i loved speedball back in the day.

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ShamblerDK

If anyone wants to see a reverse engineering of the MOS 6502, here you go: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fWqBmmPQP40

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who8myfish

There is no such thing as piracy. Money you didn't make is not the same as money being stolen from you.

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Matt Kerr

"Paten pending" lol

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WAC

Tell me more about the “Doctor V64”

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ch282

shadiest company ever

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Corey Fellows

You don't fukk with Nintendo

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Corey Fellows

Btw…ill kill ANY OF YOU GUYS READING THIS on Golden Eye or Mario Kart…

…no I'm seriously better then you

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Banana Bender

You say ff7, you show video from ff7 but it says ff6 in the title card.
This is touching parts of my autism that need to be left alone.

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CiniCraft

Nintendo: hey, stop selling these.
Bung: lick my bung hole.

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emeraldent

never knew this existed! what a cool story!

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Silent Lamb

feck me i had one of those lol

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Uden One-Eye

Huh huhuh huhuhuh… Bung.

I think intellectual property rights and copyright really just impedes us as a species honestly. Same with currency. We sure do love to shackle ourselves.

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rollie

You could turn this into a drinking game: Take a drink every time he says bung Dr V64

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ุ ุ

Nintendo have always been mega faℊℊots huh.

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SpringLakeDawn

Thanks for the insights into this variant. I was familiar with the Super Wild Card for the SNES (a friend got one in the early nineties and it blew me away back then). I didn't know about the Doctor v64. And all of these devices seem to have originated from Hong Kong. Wild ground back then it appears :-).

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Matt Voyer

brb buying a bungbox 420 immediately

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Brian

I see a white Bung, and I want to paint it black.

That way it will better match the N64!

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The Chondrite

They shoukd have used the Bang device, to develop games on cd for the n64 and not this stupud 50mb cartridges 😀

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stirange

Sound like Nintendo was trying to send Bung Into a ……… hole

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Yo Mama

Yes 😈

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Gregg Ordon

Is the N64 CD Plus the same thing? I have one at home but the menu system seems a bit more advanced.

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creator Space

That's a good one.
https://blog.naver.com/7heppy7

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Sledge Hammer

N64 was also called like a smoke machine. The graphics were washed out with each title, plus the low sound quality. The N64 was a crappy console which is proven by most games.

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Sledge Hammer

N64 was also called like a smoke machine. The graphics were washed out with each title, plus the low sound quality. The N64 was a crappy console which is proven by most games. I still remember how Nintendo has released any render images that have not even mirrored the way the console really can. Because that was not much.

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Sledge Hammer

Why are you showing the games via an emulator? In Real, the games were not so high and looked completely washed out. A Sickness of the N64. So please show the original graphics knows what you show in the video does not match the original

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Sledge Hammer

https://youtu.be/HrQYdr0FY70?t=743 Thats From Emulator !

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David L

I have a 256mb Doctor V64 with DS1:Super Doctor Save Card, and DX 256:Super Game Saver which stores 256 battery EEPROM save states.  
Originally designed to work with Bung's V64 back-up unit, the DX 256 cart works by plugging into the N64's cartridge slot — the game then plugs into the top of it. The front of the DX 256 has two knobs, one numbered 1 to 16 and one lettered A to P. All the combinations of the two knobs equal 256. For each location on the cart you can save another set of saved games.You must restart the system each time before trying to access a new set of saved games.
While this hardware would allow you to have many, many saved games, the area that had its best application was the rental market. When you rent a cart for a few days and bring it back to the rental store, your saved game usually falls victim to evil Timmy, the kid who rents the game after you. Not any more. Your saved game with the DX 256 stays in the unit. You could rent a game one weekend, save your games using the DX 256 and rent a different cart the next weekend and carry on where you left off

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ugzz

hehe hehe.. Hey Butthead.. He said "Bung". hehe hehe

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Yazzzir

Final fantasy 7 Roman numerals are wrong opp

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Baz Daniels

copying isn't piracy. piracy is assailing a ship on the high seas intending to steal and willing to kill.
copyright infringement isn't piracy. Supreme Court said using the word "piracy" to refer to infringement serves no purpose other than to mislead and inflame.
copying isn't infringement unless done for a commercial purpose. too much intimidation words.

There are copy machines in libraries. There are DVR options for football games, TV shows, movies.
Supreme Court said people are allowed to even build up an entire library of copies of copyrighted material so long as it is for personal use.

Way too much intimidation language going around.

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Baz Daniels

commercial manufacture and distribution can be illegal, but playing N64 games cannot. No such thing as "playing N64 games illegally." Too much intimidation language going around.

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Jarrod

That is a piracy tool in anybody's book… That's like saying a Car is a Manslaughter tool. It's just a tool. It's how you use it. Granted, odds are probably in favor of piracy.

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James Silver

your header says final fantasy VI instead of VII in the video.

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Clarissa 1986

Imagine this setup for real released games on CD… This would have been so awesome. N64, with non-shaky graphics and still big storage capacity for games. Which means good quality cutscenes and all those goodies. They could have used the games port on the upper side to upgrade it even more with horsepower and ram, while using the underside to let it have a CD drive… Or atleast some special Disk format with multiple hundrets of megabytes, as it was planned for the 64DD. It's just so sad that they never truly released the 64DD and games for it… I mean worldwide and in masses… The 64DD could have extended its lifecycle even more, and so the games library for N64 would be even bigger today. And we could have seen more awesome games 🙁 After the PS1 could do so much, the more powerful N64 truly could have shown us even more I think :/ But after all, the Gamecube wasn't a bad idea too, so it's fine. A delay in GameCube release maybe could have lowered its success. So what do I know about what would have been the best for Nintendo. But still, I think it was sad that Nintendo never truly released the 64DD here in Europe. I had a Nintendo64 back then and I saw informations about it in Nintendo mags, but I never saw a release of it. I was so hyped about it, just to find out it all was dumped 🙁 So much engineering and hard work they invested into it, just dropped, instead of releasing it…

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fiskfisk33

*VII

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Behemog

A small misstake was made: Final Fantasy VII video and title is Final Fantasy VI 2:53

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Todd Molloy

Okay hey guys so we're talking about a pirating tool today
And
WE ARE DEMONIZED TO INFINITE AND BEYOND 🤣

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stickygrn1420

please make a video about the pmo contest in 98

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alma mater

Name of the intro song PLS??????

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melonbobful

Thank goodness for seriously smart people who love reverse engineering things.

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ernesto dors

ask valentino rossi nickname the doctor nr 64……hmmmmm !!!!!!! i'm one to something

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Maktown TV

I was in my late teens when this thing came out. For context, I was 18 and graduated from high school in 2000. I was DEEP into the bootleg videogame scene. We used to mail each other CDRs in the mail. I always wanted a DoctorV64 and a Z64 but I was a teenager with barely any money. –– https://aded.us/mb

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DR SATAN

2:34 anyone else play waverace? i still got my copy

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iforget iremember

srsly fascinating… gonna like

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Deleted ions

How do we pirate switch games. I hate nintedo they charge way too much, force old games at the same stupid prices. Nothing loses value, no sales money off games. Even used they sell for nearly as much. They your kid goes and loses the stupid small things sometimes a day after getting it. Some dumb teens even choke on them. Fk nintendo i will gladly download free games. Im already 100s down on their BS. I wish i brought my kids a ps4 each. The games are 10x more effort to create and half the price. Years later cost almost nothing. But not nintendo they'll port a 20yr old game and demand AAA at release prices indefinitely. I have 0 loyalty for that crap. Owned every nintendo made except wiiU and lesser known ones. So yh how do i download free games to the switch?

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Sir Shrooms

what is your wallpaper? i really want it haha

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Citizen of Earth

Nintendo is for toddlers, as is the mental state of their executives.

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JMacQ77

One of my friends had a "development device" for our N64s. But that one mounted on the top of the console and used ZIP disks.

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