SHAKSHUKA | healthy breakfast recipe (or anytime of day recipe)

SHAKSHUKA | healthy breakfast recipe (or anytime of day recipe)

SHAKSHUKA | healthy breakfast recipe (or anytime of day recipe)

By Bryan Wright 100 Comments August 22, 2019


– Hey guys, my recent
trip to Israel and Jordan was a phenomenal trip. And I’m still going through
the 2,000 plus photos I took so that I can do a proper blog post recap. (upbeat electronic music)
But in the meantime, I wanted to share with you
one of my favorite recipes that I ate over and over, in Israel. And that’s shakshuka. Shakshuka is a traditional, Middle Eastern and North African dish that can be eaten for
breakfast, lunch, or dinner. And it’s a simple combination
of simmering tomatoes, onions, garlic, spices, and poached eggs. I love this recipe
because it’s nourishing, filling, easy to make
with everyday ingredients. And it’s just one of those recipes that you will make time and again. So let me show you how to make it. The word shakshuka
literally means a mixture. And that’s what we’re gonna do. Just mix a handful of ingredients
together in a saute pan. So we’ll start with dicing one onion and one red bell pepper. You can dice them as large
or fine as you’d like, depending on how chunky you’d like your shakshuka to turn out. And after you’ve diced
up the red bell pepper, dice up four garlic cloves. (upbeat electronic music) Once everything is all chopped up, grab a large saute pan, and
turn on your stove to medium. Heat up two tablespoons of olive oil and add the chopped onion
and bell pepper to the pan. Give these a stir for about five minutes or until the onion has become translucent. Next, add your chopped
garlic and your spices. Shakshuka spices may vary a bit, depending on where in the
world you’re eating it. But I’m using a combination of paprika, cumin, and chili
powder, which is most common. So add two teaspoons of
paprika, one teaspoon of cumin, and a quarter teaspoon of chili powder. Then, stir that together
for another minute, to really bring out the
flavors in the spices and let them work their magic. For the tomatoes in this recipe, I like to use whole peeled tomatoes as it makes this process
exceptionally easy and fast. And you don’t have to wait for fresh tomatoes to break down. But you could certainly
use fresh tomatoes as well. So dump the entire 28 ounce
can of tomatoes into your pan. And then, use a large spoon or spatula to break up the tomatoes. My only word of caution, here, is to be careful not to have tomato juice squirt down the front of you.
(upbeat electronic music) After a few minutes, your sauce
should be simmering again. And that’s when it’s time to add the eggs. So create little wells
in the tomato mixture, and crack an egg into each well. In total, you’ll wanna crack
six eggs into the sauce. And I do five around the
edge and one in the middle. Once all the eggs are in the saute pan, reduce the heat to low, cover the pan, and set the timer for
five to eight minutes, depending on how soft or
firm you like your eggs. I always start with five minutes and then, check to see if they
need a little bit more time. (upbeat electronic music)
While the shakshuka is simmering, you’ll wanna chop up some fresh herbs for the top. You could use fresh parsley or cilantro or a combination of both
as I’m doing, today. And when it comes to this dish, I say the more fresh herbs, the better. Your shakshuka should be just
about done at this point. So remove the lid, check on your eggs. And if they’re cooked to your
liking, you’re good to go. Because all that’s left to do is season with salt and pepper and generously sprinkle
your fresh herbs on top. (upbeat electronic music) I like my eggs with firm whites but still a bit runny on the yoke. And I’d say this looks
pretty darn perfect. You can see where this makes
such a great meal for families, holidays, and really,
just any day of the week. It’s super easy, packed with
flavor, and very delicious. On the blog post for this recipe, I also show you a single serving portion that I enjoyed, while in Tel Aviv. So yes, you could scale this down for easy, individual servings as well. (upbeat electronic music) I hope you guys enjoyed today’s video. And if you did, make sure
to give it a thumbs up as that helps to support my channel. And if you’re not already subscribed, make sure to hit that
subscribe button, below. I will see you, again,
in next week’s video. (upbeat electronic music)

100 Comments found

User

جزائرية وافتخر Proud Algerian English Teacher

In Algeria we also call it chakchouka

Reply
User

Natasha Miesse

I made this for my large family of 6–I added as many eggs as I could fit in my pan…I think it ended up being about 9 eggs. Took longer to get them cooked to runny-yolk, but probably because there were so many, lol. Surprisingly, everyone at it–kids ranging from 3-9 years. Thanks for the recipe!

Reply
User

Leslie Heavingham

Yum! I will definitely try this. Thanks ❤

Reply
User

جزائرية وافتخر Proud Algerian English Teacher

Let me say that also we call it Chakchouka maurice . I do not know whi is Maurice but I may say it is Jewish when they were living once in Algeria

Reply
User

Steph C

opens spice drawer
Me; “damn!”

Reply
User

אבי מאיר

So simple and so yummy!
Love from Israel!

Reply
User

Maria C

Since when are eggs healthy? Full of cholesterol and increases risks in prostate cancer

Reply
User

Zoéy

this dish is so versatile , i love it . i often like to add cooked sweet potatoe cut in cubes or cooked beens , at home in Tunisia we often have Merguez on the side with this as well ! yumm yumm

Reply
User

KuroiMajo

Yes! IT'S ONE OF THE BEST ISRAELI DISHS :)))
btw – your spices drawer is my new goal. AMAZING!

Reply
User

Its Sinclair Time

In my house we do shakshuka all the time for breakfast specifically

Reply
User

Nudem Babür

E bizim Menemen bu

Reply
User

Yanna Kassim

Ohmaiigoddd… Your spices drawer are amazing!!!!!

Reply
User

Mohammed Hasan

Amazing
I am from the Middle East (Palestine), this dish is deeply traditional especially for lazy weekends morning breakfast. But I recommend to try it without onion (as we used to prepare) and with extra extra Chili pepper. I SWEAR you will love it.

Reply
User

Dona-Ly Sinimeri

I Like that she uses onion and garlic almost in every video. I really love onion and garlic. And she is so beautiful! I’m soon gonna try her recipes, are someone tried already?

Reply
User

abu rahman

I am hungry, keep doing 💛

Reply
User

Ayse Snyder

we call this dish ‘Menemen’ in Turkey. Shakshuka is whole other dish. Basicly fried diced eggplants, pepper and potatoe and toss it into the fresh tomatoe and garlic sauce. Both are So yummy. 😋

Reply
User

Denis Denchev

I love this recipe, I'm from Bulgaria and we make the same thing called Mish-Mash (which also means a mixture) but the only difference is we stir the eggs in and add firm white cheese at the end. Next time you make this definitely try it with cheese 🙂

Reply
User

Marjan F

I love your lifestyle and I watch your videos over and over. Please continue teaching us simple recipes.
I grew up drinking lots of tea and we used to eat something like cake, biscuits while drinking tea.
I really like to have something to eat with tea (free from gluten and sugar).

Reply
User

Cristina da Graça

Hummm delicious I will try today.Thank you so much 🙏

Reply
User

Chewlie mukbangs

This looks good! Reminds me of a dish called eggs in purgatory, which is delicious too! I wonder if I can substitute the fresh red pepper for Cento jarred roasted red peppers? The fallen off cooked skin on fresh red peppers always stick to my throat in an unpleasant way. The Cento ones are peeeled. But do you think that would work ok in the recipe?

Reply
User

Irina Razina

Whole30 compliant?!

Reply
User

minnie lee

lol, at all the religious/political comments. It's just food we're talking here. Namely, a tasty egg dish that is not specifically tied to any one country, made by a lady who runs a home and cooking channel. So who cares whether Shakshuka is Israeli or not. That is so petty. Such political comments belong elsewhere.

Reply
User

Arrenga harasgama Nadaraja

I love these videos. You've got yourself a new aubscriber. Does anyone help you film these beautiful videos. ??

Reply
User

SuperDubios

Shakshuka existed way before there was an entity called Israel. So claiming this dish as Israeli is false by its very definition.

Reply
User

Lory A

damn, even her links are all organized

Reply
User

Vibha B

Okay that spice drawer though!! 👀

Reply
User

cease_33rd

More like Huevos Rancheros!

Reply
User

Epartners Marketing

It's an African dish. Other cultures eat it, but it's from Africa.

Reply
User

Sevda Parfonova

It's very simple and delicious

Reply
User

kay a

its actually an arab dish and shakshuka is an arabic word 🙂 not israeli

Reply
User

Baroness James

In Bulgaria we call this Mishmash and add some feta cheese. 😊 because Bulgarians can't live without yoghurt or white cheese (feta). 😊 I love it but it takes a while to be made so for us it was usually diner.

Reply
User

RozSugar TV

Hi I really like this dish which I often have in one of my fav cafes in paris. Id like to use this recipe to cook with my kids. just doubt if they can eat spiciy dish tho… Thanks for your recipe !!

Reply
User

Saray Ortiz

Ok ahora tengo que ver si tenemos suficientes tortillas antes de que comienze esto

Reply
User

KayLeigh Lopez

I just found your channel today and holy cow! I'm so glad that I did!! I LOVE to eat healthy and I'll be trying several of your recipes 🙂

Reply
User

Khawla Alfalasi

It is Palestinian not ISRAEL!!!?!

Reply
User

O²B

Yea Bebeh

Reply
User

Neill Shaw

Wow!!! Just found your channel. Top class stuff. Many thanks – you’re added to my Low Carb Healthy channel list!

Reply
User

Christine Miner

Made this today for dinner—-delicious! The family says thank you!

Reply
User

ChelseaFC !!!

It's not a "Middle Eastern and North African" dish, it's an Arabic dish, the name and everything about it comes from the Arab world, not Israel.
By the way you should've eaten that with some pita bread tastes better that way!

Reply
User

Ana Catarina

Olive oil Galo delicious…

Reply
User

Mark Antonowsky

I would add Jalapeno… 🙂

Reply
User

crazywriterchic

Oh my goodness I completely forgot about this and haven't made it in months! Next week's meatless Monday for sure!

Reply
User

Ivonne Barrios

I love it , thanks for sharing this delicious recipe

Reply
User

11eleven Cherry111

Add feta cheese and spring onions🍸🍒

Reply
User

Suley Jah

Will try it definetly.

Reply
User

suhaila alelimi

its an Arab dish actually , Israelis learned it from the Palestinians long time ago, i liked your recipe even though its slightly different than ours witch i think its the original one, love to see more middle eastern dishes especially from jordan.

Reply
User

Atreides22222

Damn, it looks so good, gotta try this recipe!

Reply
User

Jocelyn Cruz

Reminds me of huevos rancheros 😋

Reply
User

FreedomWriter3

That looks so good!

Reply
User

jolly is a fan

You eat that for breakfast? Anything added to it or only that?

Reply
User

Tommy BRO

I cannot live with this without rice. My beautiful 2 cups of rice.

Reply
User

nawar

شكشوكه من أفريقيا 🙂.

Reply
User

Mike Kelly

I LOVE YOUR CHANNEL. I came across it while searching for a blender. I watched your review of the various Vitamix blenders and it was very helpful. I watched your other video's and am now hooked on your channel. Excellent work, and thank you.

Reply
User

Mike Kelly

I LOVE THAT SPICE DRAWER.

Reply
User

Somebody Somewhere

Did this yesterday and it turned out great! Thanks for the delicious recipe….you now have a new subscriber

Reply
User

Andrew Bruce

Why, why, why do Americans say "erbs" ! It has an H, it's Herbs ! nice video though xx

Reply
User

TXP9

Your spice drawer is a life goal

Reply
User

Ritu r

I tried it and it was wonderful ❤️ thank you for this wonderful recipe ❤️

Reply
User

Taufik Hidayat

Endolita 😘😍 From indonesia

Reply
User

rwalker0130

I make a version of this 2-3 times a week but shred carrots and let them soften with the onion. With the base of onion, egg garlic and tomato you can use just about any other veggies and it tastes great

Reply
User

sup

Slowest knife work ever

Reply
User

Kelly M. Tirivanhu

What’s your Instagram username Lisa?

Reply
User

Shelley Picott

Definitely something that makes for a great meatless meal during Lent. Thanks for this one.

Reply
User

Foufa Bifa

Tchaktchouka it's an algerian dish but in algeria we eat it at lunch ana dinner 😉 mmm yes

Reply
User

Ece Ergüney

I am from Turkey and we never eat şakşuka (in Turkish language:) for the breakfast! And we never add eggs to that. I just wanted to share this information and it is really interesting for me to see another version of our şakşuka! 🙂

Reply
User

christianne delos santos

Just finished serving this up in a bowl.I have to say that this is delicious. It was also super easy to make, and i’m 14. I would definitely make this again.

Reply
User

Yaman Shashaa

Palestine*

Reply
User

r c

Nice. Yummy recipe. What ingredient should be used to reduce quantity of tomatoes?

Reply
User

Yasmine Ayari

I’m from Tunisia, and we usually add A LOT of tomato paste and Harissa

Reply
User

Yusli Yusoff

You forgot completely to mention Palestine as Israel is a part of the original country

Reply
User

Diana S

I am not from the Middle East, just next to it :), but we used to make similar dish, (no cumin, though, just salt and pepper for spices, and sometimes omitted garlic in the morning). We were mixing whipped eggs in, instead of cooking them whole in separate wells.  P.S. And I am as impressed with your spice drawer as almost everyone here 🙂

Reply
User

Gary

It looks a really delicious dish I will definitely will try to make it thank you

Reply
User

Watchman Onthewall

Love your vids, blog and all your info, really concise and interesting! Just a suggestion, a change in music on your vids would really make them amazing, like adding super quality ingredients and fresh herbs to a dish makes it gourmet I would suggest some contemporary chill music because your camera and background has that vibe already visually, you'll be amazed at how "delicious" your vids become!

Reply
User

Fifi Coney Island

Lol for families she says. This looks like one serving plus an avocado and some naan

Reply
User

Donna Grogg

This looks delicious, one could add mushrooms too for a meatier dish. Thanks for the wonderful recipes.

Reply
User

Meri Scott

That looks really good!

Reply
User

Ruth Aquino

I like your recipe 😊

Reply
User

Tonya Gordon

Do you have a recipe for classic baked eggs?

Reply
User

Iylia Haris

I saw u wearing glasses while cooking the shakshuka… nice

Reply
User

Top Best Talent

Your Kitchen is so great Love your Spice Mmmmm yum….A+A+A+

Reply
User

Derek Davies

Impressive spice draw!!.

Reply
User

She does it all

how do you store and reheat this?

Reply
User

ubershredder1989

if i cook this in the evening, can i store it in the refrigerator overnight, to eat for breakfast? i am just asking because, the eggs may be a little runny, not sure if its too nice to keep in the fridge …

Reply
User

Adam Aourara

Shakshuka is of north african origin.

Reply
User

Healthy and Happy!

Excellent! Keep up the great work!

Reply
User

Sweet Lodia

I will try and leave it longer so the egg cook more. I only like semi cooked egg in omelette. I missed my mom's shakshuka

Reply
User

Abdullahi Osman

It's called Palestine….

Reply
User

Isabel Rayes

🙏🙏🙏🙏🙏😋😋😋😋

Reply
User

porticoman

Looks amazing. As does the shakshuka. Great spice drawer, and a fantastic kitchen sword. Where did you get it from, the Middle Ages?

Reply
User

FrugalOverFifty

I got inspired to try a version of this last night – and I made it again this morning. So I had to come back and watch the video to see what I was missing. Mostly I got it right, and it was delicious! I considered a generous portion of the sauce plus three eggs to be one serving. 🤣. It was so good!!!

Reply
User

Snack School

Love it!

Reply
User

Esoteric Mystery

Wow you got enough spices in there?

Reply
User

Helen 49

😋😋😋

Reply
User

Winnie Tan

Hi Lisa. Where can I find the recipe for a single portion?

Reply
User

Élisabeth Sauriol

That was so good 10/10 👌

Reply
User

Mihajlo Mladenovic

Brt moj to ti je Sataras a ne saksuka, jebemte nenormalna

Reply
User

Rob Arnold

Made this exactly as instructed and it was FANTASTIC! Thanks for the recipe!

Reply
User

Ulku The Great

Hi, I'm from Turkey, and we have shakshuka too, however with slightly (!) different ingredients. Instead of the eggs, we put in fried eggplant and peppers and is usually eaten as a meze (side dishes).

Reply
User

magnetictheory

Looks delicious, but I would recommend seasoning this dish much earlier, and add a knob of butter at the end.

Reply
User

Sara Sara

😍😍😍😍😍😍😍😍♥️♥️♥️

Reply

Add Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *