Ron Duncan’s Story | Vanderbilt Health Stories of Impact

Ron Duncan’s Story | Vanderbilt Health Stories of Impact

Ron Duncan’s Story | Vanderbilt Health Stories of Impact

By Bryan Wright 0 Comment October 12, 2019


(bright music) – I live an extremely blessed life. My interests mainly are just
in my family and my church and I really still love baseball and softball at this time in my life. I received a phone call on
Februaray the 28th of 2013. My primary care physician told me that I had peritoneal carcinomatosis, all I could find on the
internet was basically a death sentence. It’s not something that you can battle, it’s not something that they can save you with chemotherapy and I found myself in a
place that I’d never been. I was gripped with fear, to the point of not being able to breath. They gave me a six to nine months with chemotherapy or not. Depending on how long I would live and whether the chemo would kill me before the cancer would. – My name is Jill Duncan. And Ron and I have been married 38 years. What do you say when your husband tell you he has terminal cancer? – I didn’t know how to tell my sons. We came back and met
with Dr. Kamran Idrees. But I was rather vocal about there’s got to be something you can do with this 53-year-old, hopefully somewhat in shape body. I don’t have any pain. There’s got to be something you can do. – He presented with a stage
four appendiceal tumor. And I was recruited
here to build a program, you know, the HIPEC program, which is essentially a heated chemo bath in the abdominal cavity for these cancers. – And at that point he
showed me the cancer that was encompassing about
eight different organs. – We evaluated him and we read his pathology biopsy results from outside and we thought that, you know, because of his good health and everything, that he would be a good
candidate for the procedure. – He said, “Well, what we can do is we can have cytoreductive HIPEC surgery.” And he explained that to us in detail. – Dr. Idrees was very straightforward and I like that. – He removed my spleen, my gallbladder, my omentum, four or five feet of my small intestine, three or four feet of my large intestine, and my appendix… What was left. – Subsequently, you know, he has been, thankfully, disease free for almost six years now. – Vanderbuilt-Ingrim Cancer Center has been a huge beacon of hope to me. – On our last appointment with Dr. Idrees when he actually said the words, “Go live your life.” Saying that Ronny was cancer free. Ronny asked, “Well what can we do?” He said, “We wanna give back.” And Dr. Idrees said, “We need money. We need
money for research. We need money to make
this treatment better.” – We feel by donating and giving funds and raising funds to the
RAD project either just from outside donations or from our concert or from a playing golf tournament or whatever we can, for Vanderbuilt-Ingrim Cancer Center, and peritoneal carcinomatosis. If we’re part of the solution and we can ever even feel in our
hearts that we helped, what else is there? (inspiring music)

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