DOCTOR reacts to CELLS AT WORK! // Episode 8 // "Blood Circulation"

DOCTOR reacts to CELLS AT WORK! // Episode 8 // "Blood Circulation"

DOCTOR reacts to CELLS AT WORK! // Episode 8 // "Blood Circulation"

By Bryan Wright 36 Comments May 23, 2019



hello welcome to sick notes my name's ed hope I'm a junior doctor in the UK and on this channel we take a look at everything to do a medicine the human body and what it's like to be a doctor as well I know it's been a long time covered I'm really sorry about I'm continuing my look at the fantastic series cells at work so this is episode 8 blood circulation okay so we have red blood cell in the house or more accurately in the inferior vena cava inferior means for Neath as opposed to superior which means above so the inferior vena cava is the main vein that collects all the blood from the abdomen the pelvis and the lower limbs and returns it to the heart whereas a superior vena K that would collect all the blood from the head the neck and the upper limbs and again would return it to the heart don't forget the blood traveling in the veins has already supplied oxygen to the tissue so we call it D oxygenated it's blood is a slightly darker red color as we can see here as a red blood cell has the dark side of her jacket showing also the red blood cells in venous blood are slightly larger – this is B good red blood cells have a key role in transporting carbon dioxide to do this chemical reactions take place within the red blood cells and this draws in water from the blood plasma making the red blood cells slightly bigger so the red blood cell is lost again it's a lovely overview of the circulation system of the body so we see the artery supplying blood to the organs from the heart and the slightly darker red color of the blood in the venous system taking it back to the heart frequently we see veins in diagrams like this depicted as blue they aren't blue they're red as we said earlier it's just the skin and soft tissues over the top two blood vessels make them look like they're blue a couple of nice points worth pointing out here first of all we see the liver here a major metabolic organ increased important proteins breaks down toxins towards vitamins and sugars also produces digestive juices so rightly has a large blood supply and the outline of the stomach here probably representing the whole of the gut actually again a very active organ and would get preferential blood supply when we've had a meal so it can not only get more energy to work but also give an opportunity for all the new kids from the food to get into the blood supply and notice here how the blood from the gut doesn't go straight back into the venous system important but a nice little touch this little vein connecting the gut to the liver is representing the portal system the hoods like some kind of time-traveling apparatus when in fact it means that everything from the gut is first passed through the liver which makes complete sense right it gives the liver an opportunity to process or the proteins and break down some of the toxins before it gets released into the systemic circulation although I know if I don't mention this I'll get so many comments there our blood vessels that go directly from the gut to the systemic circulation we call these portosystemic and nasty Moises Porto because this is called the portal system systemic because it's going to the systemic circulation and anastomosis is a term we use when two tubes are connected together in this instance blood vessels and last but not least at the bottom here we have the kidneys again a super important organ has lots of functions actually but primarily involved in regulation of the blood and in turn regulation of the body so passing water getting rid of waste products and maintaining your bloods pH again a significant amount of blood flow is required to do this so the kidneys would be receiving around about a quarter of your heart's output who the hell is this guy we find out that they're a germ so a general term for a bacterial virus or fungus I'm not sure what specific germ this is there's normally clues to him at what it is but I'm not too sure but many of them can cause hemolysis as perfectly described here it means destruction of the red blood cells so heam referring to hemoglobin in the red blood cells and lysis meaning to split open we met lots of bacteria in previous episodes that cause hemolysis including streptococcus pneumoniae streptococcus pyogenes and Staphylococcus aureus now whatever German was it got a large log because you know white blood cells back in town so we know red blood cells don't have a nucleus we learned this in episode 6 this is so there's more rubble over to carry hemoglobin and for a similar reason they don't have mitochondria you don't say that word without saying it's the powerhouse of the cell so it red blood cells don't have their powerhouse how do they perform respiration in order to get energy to maintain their cell membranes and perform chemical reactions the truth is that mitochondria are not the only way we produce energy they are by far the most efficient way of producing energy via process that involves the Krebs cycle but another process can take place in the cytoplasm of the cell process called glycolysis we learn lysis earlier so this is breaking down glucose into pyruvate this is not a very efficient way of generating energy but it's also the only way of creating energy without oxygen so called anaerobic respiration so without any mitochondria and the red blood cell would be creating small amounts of energy through glycolysis within in cytoplasm so we meet the heart and I like the way they've done it in this kind of public information video like the type of thing you'd get at an airport and it's funny if they use the term congested here using congested congested in the context of the heart is not a good thing so when the heart begins to fail we get blood backing up in the veins this is what we refer to as congested and the whole process itself we refer to as congestive heart failure I don't think that's what they're representing here they're just explaining that lots of blood is returning to the heart there's this amazing overview of the circulation in this segment showing the blood flow from the right side of the heart to the lungs to the left side of heart and then to the whole body people learning circulation systems should definitely check this out I definitely recommend it I know they allow stuff to be shown in school so this thing in particular will be very good to teach from so let's follow the faff ourself using their diagrams so our heart is a beautiful muscular pump made up of the right side and a left side separated by a central septum each side has two chambers the smaller atria at the top whose job is to fill the larger ventricles beneath it whose job is in turn to send blood to the lungs if it's the right ventricle or to the body if it's the left ventricle and to make sure that this blood flows in the correct way there are four valves on the exit of each of these chambers [Applause] school so first stop right atrium and they're waiting to go through the tricuspid valve into the right ventricle as beautifully explained here the tricuspid valve allows blood to flow from the right atria to the right ventricle that stops it flowing back through the other way tricuspid as they say here tri meaning three and cuspid because we call the flaps of the valve the Leafs of the valves we call them cusps so this valve has three cusps oh my god this is so cool so we're in the right ventricle now and these string or cords from the ceiling are instantly recognizable as the chordae tendineae literally meaning tendon cords and if you cut open a ventricle this is exactly what you'll see these cords are attached to the cusps of the tricuspid valve and stop the valve from effectively turning inside out which would obviously compromise the valve the valve compromised in any way like this this can happen pathologically we'd call it valve the valve insufficient or regurgitant so this is when a valve is open when we really want it to be closed the other problem with a valve is when it might be really difficult to open so we want it to open but it's not quite open so this is you hear it patients refer to this as a sticky valve but the medical term for this is stenosis any valve can become insufficient or Stern nosed and this can lead to turbulent flow through the heart and therefore a heart murmur that's all a heart murmur is really says any turbulent flow through the heart of which valve problems is one of the more common causes okay so we're moving through the right ventricle through the Pommery valve and into the pulmonary artery the only artery with deoxygenated blood pretty sure that's a regular pub quiz question hi so we've reached the lungs and we see the alveolar sacs this is the very end part of your Airways and so you have your windpipe your cheek here that divides into the two main bronchi which divide into Lobert bronchi so your lung is divided into lobes and then we have segmental bronchi because your lobes are divided into segments and then we have sub segmental bronchi so all of these are getting smaller and smaller lines kind of tree like structure then these further divided into bronchioles of which there are many different types which I can't remember I'll top my head and then into the alveolar ducts which is where we find the alveolar or the alveolar sacs right the end and these have blood vessels around them as we can see here because this is where the gas exchange occurs so the main reason we have all these airwaves dividing up is to increase the surface area so that more gas exchange can occur so here we see the red blood cell collecting oxygen as part of the gas exchange so now we'll be off to the left side of the heart via the pulmonary vein the only way to have oxygenated blood another a pop quiz question for you there are two kind of gargoyle statues here I'm thinking they're important because they're given quite a bit of prominence actually but I don't I can't think what they could be saying you guys know what this is a reference to then let me know below I'd be interested to know so we don't see the next steps but from the lungs would go into the left atrium and then through the mitral valve into the left ventricle again we'd see the chordae tendineae this time belonging to the mitral valve this valve has to cuss rather than the tricuspid three then finally the blood would be pumped through the aortic valve in today i aughtta and around the body as we've just seen here so I recognize these guys from the previous episode streptococcus pyogenes as we mentioned earlier they are capable of causing hemolysis they produce a toxin could strep the lisen that breaks down the red blood cell but that's not happening today and here we see a red blood cell squeezing through a capillary the smallest blood vessel in the body and this is exactly what happens by having them just wider than a red blood cell means that the oxygen and the nutrients in the blood can more easily diffuse through into the tissues so there you go my thoughts on episode 8 of cells at work not so much a story this one but it's not really about the kind of cells more of the wider physiology of kind of how the heart works which I thought I did a brilliant job in terms of translating and this is this should definitely be used as an education tool and I know they allow their videos and resources to be used in schools as well which you know if I as a teacher in school I'd definitely be using this stuff they make it so accessible and they teach it in actually really good detail too as always if I missed any of the little details then please let me know in the comments below I love hearing from you guys of little theories and stuff I've missed and things like that so if you enjoyed this video give it a like and maybe consider subscribe to the channel if you already and to everyone that has and viewed this video and all the previous videos as well as always I can't do it without you with your support and I really appreciate it so thank you so so much and I'll see you again soon

36 Comments found

User

Dr Hope's Sick Notes

Thank you for your patience everyone; I promised this video last week but only just got around to completing the edit… I was pleasantly surprised how Cells at Work handled general physiology rather than immunology, so looking forward to seeing what happens next! Hope everyone is having a super week! X

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SkaiaSkull

As they got to the lungs I became very aware of my own breathing! XD

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Kami Mashita

FINALLY

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User

lmcdoug23

I'm not sure how well it would work but do you think you could do a video on episode 3 of season 1 of Rick and Morty titled "Anatomy Park"?

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User

GAMING_SHARK 84

Awesome, once again Dr. Butt the intending pay is coming up on cells at work. Looking forward as always. Good day sir

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A Oliva

i bet season 2 starts before he finishes season 1

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User

Kugel

reason to live(I do not die ^^)

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User

Ryan Runes

cells at workkkkkkk!!!!!!!!

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A Oliva

its been soo long

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User

Rachael

Just in case you do react to casualty a great episode would be the 30th anniversary episodes some major trauma related injuries in those ones! I do believe it is series 31 episode 1! If you can’t find these maybe the cyber attack ones these were great too (series 33 episode 26/27) 🙂 have a great day dr hope!!

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TheWitchingHour

IVE WAITED FOR THIS
12 YEARS
IN AZKABAN

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ONE13

FINALLY IT'S COME!! yatta desu nee!! sankyuu Doc ur the best 👍👍👍😉

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김동하

cells at work season 2 is coming!!

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User

Mahrac

A heads up for those of you who don't pay attention to anime news, they've announced a second season for Cells at Work. No air date yet though.

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Midorima Shintaro

Oh hi there! Welcome back , mate!
This vid is pretty awesome as usual. Can't wait for the next episodes of Cells at Work reaction! <3

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Brian Demong

The chordae tendineae are colloquially known as "heart strings".

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Monar87

Can't wait for episode 12

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User

Risakisa

Finally! 😀

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User

ravenoffire87

They are making a second season of this Anime so please watch it when it comes out. I don't think its due out till next year but never the less.

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Checkers Lyisc

I was just wondering yesterday when he'll make another and here it is!!

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red muffler

Broke- Doctor reacts to Cells at Work

Woke- Cells at Work: Extended Doctor's Edition

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Rafael Zerna

Looks like Sony finally allowed you to upload again.

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User

Greig Burges

This could be a great teaching tool, it might be better if it was dubbed though.

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Johannes He

Huh… Is it vee-tamin or v-i-tamin? Or is that just another British Vs American thing?

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David N

I love it! Cells at Work is the best

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Raul

"This is exactly what happens"
So Kana Hanazawa is in every anime and in everyone of us as a blood cell , damn , she works hard.

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EnriDraws

Doctors: you are sick sir your blood cell is-

Me: opsss… Shhh.. pls dont spoil the anime

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bjam89

The heart is a temple there is a buuuuunch of temple stuff in the shots

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Wonka’s Willy

The statues look like Raijin and Fuujin, gods of Lightning and Wind. Lightining = electrical impulses, wind = gas transfer.

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Neogx148

Love how u explain so much in a interesting way makes me want to learn more about the body

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Joshua Sy

Yehey!!!

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JemiLee DaBear

I have biology final exam tomorrow, i watch this lol

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trigonometrisk

Love this series! As a med student myself, there was one aspect in this episode that I was surprised that you did not comment on – namely, local differences in blood pressure! Like how the red blood cell is wandering aimlessly in the vens cava, but is getting a huge speed boost once inside the aorta.

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Podemos URSS

12:35 White blood cells to the rescue!

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Pratama Putra Effendi

finally ep8 review by doctor

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thevioletskull

I see a hope cells at work reaction,I get to the video as quickly as possible!

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