Atrial Fibrillation can be treated best by changing your diet and lifestyle.

Atrial Fibrillation can be treated best by changing your diet and lifestyle.

Atrial Fibrillation can be treated best by changing your diet and lifestyle.

By Bryan Wright 22 Comments May 23, 2019



my name is John manarola I'm a cardiac electrophysiologist heart rhythm doctor in Louisville Kentucky been there for 20 years my 20th year I do a consultative heart rhythm work and I'm interested in atrial fibrillation one of my interest in cardiac electrophysiology heart rhythm care is the influence of lifestyle and how lifestyle can actually be both preventive and also therapeutic for for patients and we've undergone an a pretty big transformation in the last five to ten years in our field we treat atrial fibrillation it affects millions of people it used to be that we thought of atrial fibrillation as its own disease a heart rhythm disease it required medicines procedures but now the transformation is that we're beginning to understand that atrial fibrillation is actually a sign or manifestation of other kinds of typical cardiac diseases like obesity poor diet a sleep apnea alcohol intake lack of exercise and the transformation is as understanding how lifestyle can make a significant impact on both the heart rhythm any overall health of people so in medicine we're taught to find an underlying cause of diseases or conditions and we treat that underlying cause and I think the big news in atrial fibrillation care is that in most cases there are some special cases but in most cases there's causes of atrial fib and they're sort of upstream from the atrium things that affect atrial health are things that stretch the atrium like high blood pressure obesity diabetes and even stress and anxiety over exercise for instance over endurance exercise not typical exercise but over exercise all of these stimuluses are factor can have ill effects on that atrium when I started medical practice in 1996 20 years ago we basically looked for thyroid disease and valvular heart disease but now that search has been expanded into these other causes like high blood pressure obesity diabetes typical metabolic risk factors and so we we search for those and we talk to patients and look for clues of things that could be causing the afib and the reason is that if you can correct one of those causes then you can avoid some of the therapies of afib and some of the therapies are the drugs and ablation procedures they have up sides and they have down sides and if you don't even have to go there then that's a huge huge benefit one of the biggest questions patients ask is what about aspirin the the idea being that it's not as potent a blood clot blood thinner and maybe it's safer to take and there's a great debate in cardiology going on right now about the use of aspirin in patients with afib and it's really split by the Atlantic Ocean into Europe in Europe the European guidelines suggests that Aspen really doesn't work for afib it raises the risk of bleeding but does not reduce the risk of stroke so the European cardiologists pretty much say you either take a blood clotting drug or you don't take anything the north-american guidelines are a little different and they hold on to the fact that there may be some small benefit of taking aspirin one of the six one of the six major clinical trials that looked at using blood clotting drugs showed some small benefit of aspirin and North American doctors say okay there may be some benefit here's the cool thing about risk factor management if you can get a patient to improve their diet improve their exercise on sleep better and reduce their weight then these metabolic risk factors reduce their risk of having a stroke regardless and so that that's what's disruptive about lifestyle treatment in afib is it just doesn't help the rhythm it might help reduce the risk of stroke by improving the overall cardiac profile of patients I'm a specialist I learned to do cardiac procedures I do cardiac procedures and they they have a role but really I'm not just a procedural ism I'm a doctor I'm charged with helping patients and their overall health and really helping people with their overall health is more than just doing procedures is really helping them with all of the all of the factors that go into this and we know we have evidence that if you can help people with diet exercise sleep stress management you'll help them in terms of their heart rhythm and you'll help them feel better and live longer and really that's what being a doctor is all about

22 Comments found

User

peanut12345

Monger Dr. is here from Mr Pharma and doesn't know crap about 1000yr herbs .

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User

Tim W

Doctors are mostly money mongers!😧

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User

Tom Rich

magnesium, magnesium. magnesium

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User

gum trees & salt water

I have af from chemo therapy I have been treated 3 times for Hodgkin lymphoma and now I have got af and had cardiomyopathy but the cardiomyopathy is gone still need ablation for af had one but came back so need another opp

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User

baja joes

I have AFIB & have found how to control it INSTANTLY & easily!
All I need do is take a Rapid intake of breath thru my MOUTH & it instantly becomes Normal!
Good Luck!

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User

tman55575

Japanese use nattokinaise fir thinning…they think blood thinners are rat poison!

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User

Naomi May

My dad has Afib. He was diagnosed at age 38. My younger sister has Afib. She was diagnosed at age 18. I mentioned to my general practitioner that I was concerned that maybe I had Afib as well because I have always had heart palpitations. Her response was that I was too young; people are generally diagnosed in their 50s and 60s. I was a little annoyed with her response. I do have hypothyroidism though, which can cause heart rhythm issues. I have now gone plant based to prevent and cure some of my health issues.

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User

Wayne Mathews

Yea some doctors send patients for risky procedures without a thought or thinking some other safer way like exercising or diet best meds is exercise

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User

vernon padilla

He says "Blood clotting drug", does he mean to say "Blood thinning drug"?

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User

Rainy Horvath

Thank you for this supportive information.. I notice a huge difference … if I vegetarian and don't drink any alcohol, my arrhythmia is almost gone.

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User

Sharon Walter

Thank you
I was just diagnosed with a fib 3 months ago , scary trying to learn as much as I can
Thanks again

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User

Dinar AndFriends

Complete misunderstanding. AF is reduced by increasing Mg2+ intake, which competes with Ca2+. It follows that it's primarily a pro-inflammatory disease – hence the link with diabetes and obesity. It has nothing to do with 'stretching the atria'.

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User

ducksoup80

Magnesium is very important and also chiropractic. Cordyceps 3g for three months helps with afib coming from the lower part and the upper part of the heart reducing it by 83% or even illuminating a fib for some.

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User

Patty L

Dr. Mandrola took care of my mother in the early 2000's. He put a pacemaker in, and has an excellent reputation. Take his advice because he's a great Doc.

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User

Sylvia Oliva

Look into Linus Pauling research on vitamin C, with some lysine/ proline. Repairs blood vessels thereby removing plaque, which is the body's counteraction for scurvy of weak outer walls.

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User

nmedugno01

Does the same go for atrial flutter?

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Robert Grundfast

One is not going to rid themselves of FIB by simply changing diet, exercise and stress management.

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User

geoff boxer

I am 82 had ad fib for well over 20 years. Went to the doctor who put me on Wafarin and am now on Xralto, if I remember to take it. I'm still alive, exercise every day and, apart from having one kidney, 2 stents, high blood pressure, I feel perfectly fit. Probably drop dead tomorrow but thems the breaks.

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User

Agiepeggy Patrick

How about congenital SVT ..WBW

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User

VanRong Ho

love when a physician take a holistic approach for the patients' s benefit as suppose to just prescribing expensive procedure and drug.

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User

Sadia Ouam

Did anyone here have afib once and never again ?

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Destry311

I have suffered from AF my whole life….until 8 yrs ago I worked out regularly, ate well, didn’t drink, no caffeine and still needed medication. While I agree with what he says to a point because doing so would help with almost any condition however what about those of us who can no longer exercise (due to another medical condition) what are our options? Ablation?

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