A physician's thoughts and tips for patients needing hip replacement surgery - Buy Bentyl

A physician’s thoughts and tips for patients needing hip replacement surgery

A physician’s thoughts and tips for patients needing hip replacement surgery

By Bryan Wright 6 Comments December 4, 2019


I can always tell someone has a bad hip without
an x-ray, without talking to them — if I can just see their hip move. My patients, all of them, all the time, every
operation, are allowed to do everything that they want. I’ll tailor the operation to
make sure that happens. We make an incision and we take the hip completely
out of the joint. Once we get it apart, we remove the ball in a typical hip replacement
and just take a saw and cut across the bone in the appropriate area, remove the ball,
then we work on the socket part of the hip. We put a new surface to replace the worn down
cartilage that we have and then after that we turn to replacing the ball itself. The common ones over and over would be basically
infection, a blood clot can occur, or some goal not met as far as the functional outcome.
For a patient, though, they have to be comfortable that they’ve been heard, so that their symptoms
have been listened to and the operation is matched to them, not to someone else, but
to them. You’ve got to get the joint surface directly
and fully restored and you have to get the length and leverage of the muscles around
the hip correctly adjusted — they can’t be off a little bit and that’s not just
leg length, it’s a thing called offset too that has to do with how far away the center
of the movement is from the center of your pelvis. Metal we know a lot about — it’s plenty
smooth and it will never break. Ceramic’s smoother, is why you would offer it to a patient.
It has better frictional characteristics. I’ve tried hard to break some of the new
ceramic balls and I haven’t figured out a way to do so yet. No, nothing. Not a scratch, not a crack — no
marks at all. And that’s after being used, hit with a hammer, dropped out of a second
story or so window, and now run over a few times with a car. Nothing. The majority of patients, it’ll last them
the rest of their life no matter what they do.

6 Comments found

User

Owen Hoffmann

I just had a ceramic put in 2 weeks ago. unfortunately i am 24. It was due to a ski accident years ago. I wonder how long it will last.

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User

Bernard Mahoney

for ever .

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User

Lone Wolf

I'm 37 years old and a male. I was told my left hip needs to be replaced. I read too much about the surgery and now I'm utterly terrified about everything that's involved. How painful is the surgery? When I wake up from the surgery, will I feel intense pain or do the painkillers pretty much cancel it out? How long does the pain generally last?

How about pre-op preperation? For instance, how much does the epidural hurt? The epidural really scares me, and what are the chances of my spine/back getting messed up from it? How much does the cathedir hurt? Can they put it in when I'm under anesthesia? If so how much does it hurt coming out?

I'm very into bodybuilding and I'm worried that with all the time it takes to recover, that I will become fat and loose all the muscle/strength I've built thus far… How long does it take to recover to the point where I can walk around normal? Also, how long does it take for someone to recover to the point that they can go back in the gym and start weight lifting again?

If someone who had the surgery and who has experience with all this can please let me know the answers to my questions I would be very grateful. I'm avoiding the surgery because I'm so scared about everything involved, but I can no longer walk properly and have a terrible limp, and the pain is stopping me from living my life and doing all the activities I love.

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User

Lone Wolf

Can someone with any experience please answer my questions. I really need some info and guidance. I retyped my original comment with my questions below…

My original comment and questions:

I'm 37 years old and a male. I was told my left hip needs to be replaced. I read too much about the surgery and now I'm utterly terrified about everything that's involved. How painful is the surgery? When I wake up from the surgery, will I feel intense pain or do the painkillers pretty much cancel it out? How long does the pain generally last?

How about pre-op preperation? For instance, how much does the epidural hurt? The epidural really scares me, and what are the chances of my spine/back getting messed up from it? How much does the cathedir hurt? Can they put it in when I'm under anesthesia? If so how much does it hurt coming out?

I'm very into bodybuilding and I'm worried that with all the time it takes to recover, that I will become fat and loose all the muscle/strength I've built thus far… How long does it take to recover to the point where I can walk around normal? Also, how long does it take for someone to recover to the point that they can go back in the gym and start weight lifting again?

If someone who had the surgery and who has experience with all this can please let me know the answers to my questions I would be very grateful. I'm avoiding the surgery because I'm so scared about everything involved, but I can no longer walk properly and have a terrible limp, and the pain is stopping me from living my life and doing all the activities I love.

Reply
User

Sandy Scott

It’s not these overt pressures that wear a hip out….it is the slow and steady friction which creates metal on metal microscopic fragments a day at a time which get deposited in the soft tissue, bone, blood of the patient causing a thick black sludge type material to form around the prosthetic….it is not infection…it is fluid filled with chromium and other metals representing the condition metalosis….also components of the implant may fail due to body rejection of the socket liner by laying down cells which prohibit the metal against the prepared socket from fusing with the bone…also cement may come loose and ceramic components have been known to crack depositing metal in the joint space, blood and tissues….

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User

Janice MacEachern

hahaha…this has got to be the most awesome video on the parts to the hip replacement and it is 6 years old! I've got moderate osteoarthritis in right hip so I'm working at building up my different hip muscles to dodge the knife for a while yet.

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